NOWNESS: Mr. Navajo

NOWNESS: Mr. Navajo
2020
credits

Directors:

Saila Huusko and Jasper Rischen

Music:

Kino Benally and Ryan Dennison

They Call Me... Mr. Navajo

Navigating Native American life and queer identity in the wilds of New Mexico

Zachariah George is a twenty-five-year-old Native American living in the rural outcrop of White Rock, New Mexico. Going by the moniker Mr. Navajo, George wears two hats; the first as a public figure renowned for event speaking and singing in the Navajo language, the second is as an advocate for LGBTQIA+ communities.

“Mr. Navajo is an enigmatic protector of language, culture and traditional Navajo values,” say co-directors Saila Huusko and Jasper Rischen, who filmed George’s rich social life and civic duties over two years. “We first met Zachariah in the summer of 2014 and he was immediately captivating. This film is a small love letter to staying true to who you are.”

In this intimate portrait of a young man living in the heart of his community, George defies rigid constructions of gender and sexuality in the Navajo community by pairing traditional regalia, fabrics and textiles with his bedazzled phone and French manicured nails.

To fully understand the cultural and religious history of sexuality in native communities, the filmmakers spoke to Jennifer Denetdale, a humanities professor and the first-ever Diné, or Navajo, to earn a Ph.D in History.

“George lives to defy rigid constructions of gender and sexuality”

“Nádłeehé is an old Diné word that appears in our creation narratives,” Denetdale says of the term George self-identifies with. “It signifies the presence of a third gendered being who is endowed with knowledge, skills and talents that are crucial to the wellbeing of our family and kin.”

Getting people to embrace this word is a step towards acknowledging that LGBT communities have always been a part of Navajo history. It creates an irrefutable bond to their ancestors and affirms their place in contemporary society.

“Nádłeehé means that gender diversity was always recognized among the Diné,” the academic continues, “and that our relatives are contributing members who revitalize cultural practices and are activists for Diné nation-building and self-determination.”

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NOWNESS: Mr. Navajo

NOWNESS: Mr. Navajo
2020
Credits

Directors:

Saila Huusko and Jasper Rischen

Music:

Kino Benally and Ryan Dennison

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03
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They Call Me... Mr. Navajo

Navigating Native American life and queer identity in the wilds of New Mexico

Zachariah George is a twenty-five-year-old Native American living in the rural outcrop of White Rock, New Mexico. Going by the moniker Mr. Navajo, George wears two hats; the first as a public figure renowned for event speaking and singing in the Navajo language, the second is as an advocate for LGBTQIA+ communities.

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“Mr. Navajo is an enigmatic protector of language, culture and traditional Navajo values,” say co-directors Saila Huusko and Jasper Rischen, who filmed George’s rich social life and civic duties over two years. “We first met Zachariah in the summer of 2014 and he was immediately captivating. This film is a small love letter to staying true to who you are.”

In this intimate portrait of a young man living in the heart of his community, George defies rigid constructions of gender and sexuality in the Navajo community by pairing traditional regalia, fabrics and textiles with his bedazzled phone and French manicured nails.

To fully understand the cultural and religious history of sexuality in native communities, the filmmakers spoke to Jennifer Denetdale, a humanities professor and the first-ever Diné, or Navajo, to earn a Ph.D in History.

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NOWNESS: Mr. Navajo

NOWNESS: Mr. Navajo
2020
credits

Directors:

Saila Huusko and Jasper Rischen

Music:

Kino Benally and Ryan Dennison

They Call Me... Mr. Navajo

Navigating Native American life and queer identity in the wilds of New Mexico

Zachariah George is a twenty-five-year-old Native American living in the rural outcrop of White Rock, New Mexico. Going by the moniker Mr. Navajo, George wears two hats; the first as a public figure renowned for event speaking and singing in the Navajo language, the second is as an advocate for LGBTQIA+ communities.

“Mr. Navajo is an enigmatic protector of language, culture and traditional Navajo values,” say co-directors Saila Huusko and Jasper Rischen, who filmed George’s rich social life and civic duties over two years. “We first met Zachariah in the summer of 2014 and he was immediately captivating. This film is a small love letter to staying true to who you are.”

In this intimate portrait of a young man living in the heart of his community, George defies rigid constructions of gender and sexuality in the Navajo community by pairing traditional regalia, fabrics and textiles with his bedazzled phone and French manicured nails.

To fully understand the cultural and religious history of sexuality in native communities, the filmmakers spoke to Jennifer Denetdale, a humanities professor and the first-ever Diné, or Navajo, to earn a Ph.D in History.

“George lives to defy rigid constructions of gender and sexuality”

“Nádłeehé is an old Diné word that appears in our creation narratives,” Denetdale says of the term George self-identifies with. “It signifies the presence of a third gendered being who is endowed with knowledge, skills and talents that are crucial to the wellbeing of our family and kin.”

Getting people to embrace this word is a step towards acknowledging that LGBT communities have always been a part of Navajo history. It creates an irrefutable bond to their ancestors and affirms their place in contemporary society.

“Nádłeehé means that gender diversity was always recognized among the Diné,” the academic continues, “and that our relatives are contributing members who revitalize cultural practices and are activists for Diné nation-building and self-determination.”

NOWNESS: Mr. Navajo

NOWNESS: Mr. Navajo
2020
credits

Directors:

Saila Huusko and Jasper Rischen

Music:

Kino Benally and Ryan Dennison

They Call Me... Mr. Navajo

Navigating Native American life and queer identity in the wilds of New Mexico

Zachariah George is a twenty-five-year-old Native American living in the rural outcrop of White Rock, New Mexico. Going by the moniker Mr. Navajo, George wears two hats; the first as a public figure renowned for event speaking and singing in the Navajo language, the second is as an advocate for LGBTQIA+ communities.

“Mr. Navajo is an enigmatic protector of language, culture and traditional Navajo values,” say co-directors Saila Huusko and Jasper Rischen, who filmed George’s rich social life and civic duties over two years. “We first met Zachariah in the summer of 2014 and he was immediately captivating. This film is a small love letter to staying true to who you are.”

In this intimate portrait of a young man living in the heart of his community, George defies rigid constructions of gender and sexuality in the Navajo community by pairing traditional regalia, fabrics and textiles with his bedazzled phone and French manicured nails.

To fully understand the cultural and religious history of sexuality in native communities, the filmmakers spoke to Jennifer Denetdale, a humanities professor and the first-ever Diné, or Navajo, to earn a Ph.D in History.

“George lives to defy rigid constructions of gender and sexuality”

“Nádłeehé is an old Diné word that appears in our creation narratives,” Denetdale says of the term George self-identifies with. “It signifies the presence of a third gendered being who is endowed with knowledge, skills and talents that are crucial to the wellbeing of our family and kin.”

Getting people to embrace this word is a step towards acknowledging that LGBT communities have always been a part of Navajo history. It creates an irrefutable bond to their ancestors and affirms their place in contemporary society.

“Nádłeehé means that gender diversity was always recognized among the Diné,” the academic continues, “and that our relatives are contributing members who revitalize cultural practices and are activists for Diné nation-building and self-determination.”

Also have a look at

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NOWNESS: Mr. Navajo

NOWNESS: Mr. Navajo
2020
credits

Directors:

Saila Huusko and Jasper Rischen

Music:

Kino Benally and Ryan Dennison

They Call Me... Mr. Navajo

Navigating Native American life and queer identity in the wilds of New Mexico

Zachariah George is a twenty-five-year-old Native American living in the rural outcrop of White Rock, New Mexico. Going by the moniker Mr. Navajo, George wears two hats; the first as a public figure renowned for event speaking and singing in the Navajo language, the second is as an advocate for LGBTQIA+ communities.

“Mr. Navajo is an enigmatic protector of language, culture and traditional Navajo values,” say co-directors Saila Huusko and Jasper Rischen, who filmed George’s rich social life and civic duties over two years. “We first met Zachariah in the summer of 2014 and he was immediately captivating. This film is a small love letter to staying true to who you are.”

In this intimate portrait of a young man living in the heart of his community, George defies rigid constructions of gender and sexuality in the Navajo community by pairing traditional regalia, fabrics and textiles with his bedazzled phone and French manicured nails.

To fully understand the cultural and religious history of sexuality in native communities, the filmmakers spoke to Jennifer Denetdale, a humanities professor and the first-ever Diné, or Navajo, to earn a Ph.D in History.

“George lives to defy rigid constructions of gender and sexuality”

“Nádłeehé is an old Diné word that appears in our creation narratives,” Denetdale says of the term George self-identifies with. “It signifies the presence of a third gendered being who is endowed with knowledge, skills and talents that are crucial to the wellbeing of our family and kin.”

Getting people to embrace this word is a step towards acknowledging that LGBT communities have always been a part of Navajo history. It creates an irrefutable bond to their ancestors and affirms their place in contemporary society.

“Nádłeehé means that gender diversity was always recognized among the Diné,” the academic continues, “and that our relatives are contributing members who revitalize cultural practices and are activists for Diné nation-building and self-determination.”

Also have a look at

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